Call Now! 866-415-6313

4.8 Rating | 5,000+ Clients Treated Since 2016

Table of Contents

Amphetamine vs. Dextroamphetamine: Uses, Differences, Side Effects, and More

Within the realm of neuropharmacology, amphetamine and dextroamphetamine emerge as dynamic stimulant drugs, frequently enlisted for their therapeutic prowess in managing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). As one of the prevalent neurodevelopmental disorders in childhood, ADHD presents a unique set of challenges marked by attention difficulties, hyperactivity, and impulsiveness. ADHD medications, including amphetamine and dextroamphetamine, play a crucial role in treating this disorder, offering a beacon of hope for those affected. In this blog post, we embark on a comprehensive exploration of the therapeutic landscape that amphetamine and dextroamphetamine navigate, unraveling the intricacies of their role in addressing the multifaceted dimensions of ADHD. As types of prescription medication, dextroamphetamine and amphetamine underscore the importance and regulation of medical treatment for ADHD, reflecting their significance in the medical community.

Clinically Reviewed by: Charee Marquez, LMFT

What is Amphetamine?

Amphetamine is a potent drug in ADHD therapy because it includes d-amphetamine and l-amphetamine salts that are combined in a ratio of 3:1, respectively. The drug is best suited for children above the age of three. It also includes various binders, guaranteeing that the body can function properly. 

Amphetamine is available as a tablet or capsule. The medication triggers the production of more dopamine and norepinephrine, thus exciting the nerve cells, making the individual feel more at ease, and assisting in alleviating their anxiety. 

The mental effects of amphetamine use can be compared to the high that is gotten from the intake of cocaine, except that the effects of cocaine only last around one hour. In contrast, the effects of amphetamine consumption might last from a few minutes to many hours. Using other drugs or alcohol together with amphetamine may intensify the euphoria, but you may be endangering your life.

Amphetamine Types

For the treatment of ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), healthcare professionals may prescribe different types of amphetamines. These medications are stimulants that work by increasing the levels of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, helping to improve attention and reduce hyperactivity. Common types of amphetamines used for ADHD treatment include:

  1. Dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine): This is a pure form of amphetamine and includes only the dextroamphetamine enantiomer. It is available in both immediate-release and extended-release formulations.

  2. Mixed Amphetamine Salts (Adderall): Both Adderall and Dexedrine are combinations that include dextroamphetamine, with Adderall also containing levoamphetamine. These medications share similarities in treating ADHD by enhancing focus and reducing impulsivity. Adderall comes in both immediate-release and extended-release forms.

  3. Lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse): Unlike other amphetamines, Vyvanse is a prodrug, meaning it is inactive until it is metabolized in the body. After ingestion, it is converted to dextroamphetamine, which then exerts its therapeutic effects. Vyvanse is an extended-release medication.

It’s important to note that while amphetamines are commonly prescribed for ADHD, individual responses to medications can vary. Other non-amphetamine medications, such as methylphenidate-based drugs (e.g., Ritalin, Concerta), are also frequently used to treat ADHD. Additionally, these medications, including Adderall and Dexedrine, are part of a broader category of prescription stimulants used to manage ADHD symptoms.

Amphetamine Dosages

Dosages of amphetamines vary depending on the specific medication, the formulation (immediate-release or extended-release), and the individual’s age, weight, and response to the medication. It is crucial to follow the prescribed dosage and administration instructions provided by a healthcare professional. Here are general dosage guidelines for some common amphetamine medications:

  1. Dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine):

    • Immediate-release tablets: Typically, the starting dose for adults is 5 mg once or twice daily. The dose may be adjusted based on the individual’s response.
    • Extended-release capsules: The usual starting dose for adults is 10 mg once daily in the morning.
  2. Mixed Amphetamine Salts (Adderall):

    • Immediate-release tablets: The starting dose for adults is often 5 mg once or twice daily. The dose may be adjusted based on individual response.
    • Extended-release capsules: The usual starting dose for adults is 20 mg once daily in the morning.
  3. Lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse):

    • Vyvanse is typically taken once daily in the morning. The recommended starting dose for adults is often 30 mg, with adjustments made based on individual response.

It’s important to note that dosages for children and adolescents are generally lower and are determined based on factors such as age, weight, and the severity of symptoms. Dosages may need to be adjusted over time to achieve the desired therapeutic effect with the fewest side effects.

Amphetamine Uses to Treat ADHD

The use of amphetamines varies based on the specific formulation and purpose of the medication. Here are some common uses:

  1. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Amphetamines, such as dextroamphetamine (e.g., Dexedrine), mixed amphetamine salts (e.g., Adderall), and lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse), are often prescribed to individuals with ADHD to improve focus, attention, and reduce hyperactivity.

  2. Narcolepsy: Amphetamines can be used to treat narcolepsy, a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sudden muscle weakness (cataplexy), and sleep attacks. Stimulants help manage daytime sleepiness in individuals with narcolepsy.

  3. Obesity: In some cases, amphetamines have been used to assist with weight loss. However, their use for this purpose has decreased due to concerns about potential side effects and abuse.

It’s crucial to note that the use of amphetamines should be strictly supervised and prescribed by qualified healthcare professionals.

Amphetamine Onset and Duration

The onset and duration of action of amphetamines can vary depending on factors such as the specific drug formulation, dosage, individual metabolism, and route of administration. Here are approximate onset and duration times for some common amphetamines:

  1. Dextroamphetamine:

    • Onset: The onset of action for oral dextroamphetamine is typically around 30 minutes to 1 hour after ingestion. However, it can vary depending on individual factors.
    • Duration: The duration of action for oral dextroamphetamine is usually around 4 to 6 hours. Extended-release formulations may have a longer duration of action, lasting up to 10 to 12 hours.
  2. Lisdexamfetamine:

    • Onset: Lisdexamfetamine is a prodrug that is converted into dextroamphetamine in the body. The onset of action for lisdexamfetamine is typically similar to that of dextroamphetamine, occurring within 30 minutes to 1 hour after ingestion.
    • Duration: The duration of action for lisdexamfetamine is similar to that of dextroamphetamine, lasting around 10 to 12 hours.
  3. Methamphetamine:

    • Onset: The onset of action for oral methamphetamine is similar to that of dextroamphetamine, typically occurring within 30 minutes to 1 hour after ingestion.
    • Duration: The duration of action for oral methamphetamine is similar to that of dextroamphetamine, lasting around 4 to 6 hours. However, methamphetamine is often associated with a more rapid onset and shorter duration when administered by other routes, such as smoking or intravenous injection.

It’s important to note that these are general estimates, and individual responses to amphetamines can vary. Factors such as the presence of food in the stomach, concurrent medications, and individual differences in metabolism can influence the onset and duration of action. Additionally, extended-release formulations of amphetamines may have different onset and duration profiles compared to immediate-release formulations.

How Long Does Amphetamine Stay in Your System?

The half-life of amphetamines can vary depending on factors such as the specific drug formulation, individual metabolism, and other physiological factors. However, here are approximate half-lives for some common amphetamines:

  1. Dextroamphetamine: The half-life of dextroamphetamine, a commonly prescribed amphetamine, is typically around 10-12 hours in adults. This means that it takes approximately 10-12 hours for half of the drug to be eliminated from the body.

  2. Lisdexamfetamine: Lisdexamfetamine is a prodrug of dextroamphetamine, meaning it is converted into dextroamphetamine in the body. Its half-life is slightly longer, ranging from 10 to 13 hours.

  3. Methamphetamine: Methamphetamine, a more potent form of amphetamine often associated with illicit use, has a longer half-life compared to dextroamphetamine. Its half-life can range from 10 to 12 hours in adults.

It’s important to note that these are general estimates, and individual variability can affect how quickly or slowly amphetamines are metabolized and eliminated from the body. Factors such as age, liver function, kidney function, and the presence of other medications or substances can influence drug metabolism and elimination.

How Long is Amphetamine Detectable in Your System?

The detectability of amphetamines in the body depends on various factors, including the specific drug being used, the dosage, frequency of use, individual metabolism, and the type of drug test being conducted. Here are some general guidelines for the detectability of amphetamines in different types of drug tests:

  1. Urine Test: Amphetamines are typically detectable in urine for approximately 1 to 3 days after use. However, in chronic or heavy users, detection may extend up to 7 days or longer.

  2. Blood Test: Amphetamines can be detected in blood for a shorter period compared to urine, typically within 12 to 24 hours after use. In chronic users or cases of high-dose ingestion, detection may be extended slightly.

  3. Saliva Test: Amphetamines are detectable in saliva for a shorter duration compared to urine, typically within 1 to 3 days after use.

  4. Hair Test: Amphetamines can be detected in hair follicles for a longer period compared to other types of drug tests. They may be detectable in hair for up to 90 days or longer after use, depending on factors such as the length of hair and frequency of use.

It’s important to note that these are general estimates, and individual variability can influence the detectability of amphetamines. Factors such as hydration levels, body mass index (BMI), and liver function can affect drug metabolism and elimination, potentially altering detection times.

Amphetamine Efficacy

The efficacy of amphetamines depends on various factors, including the specific condition being treated, individual response to the medication, dosage, and adherence to treatment. Here are some common conditions for which amphetamines are prescribed, along with their efficacy:

  1. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Amphetamines, such as Adderall and Vyvanse, are often prescribed to manage symptoms of ADHD, including inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Research shows that amphetamines can be effective in improving attention, focus, and impulse control in individuals with ADHD. However, efficacy may vary among individuals, and it’s essential to work closely with a healthcare provider to find the most effective treatment regimen.

  2. Narcolepsy: Amphetamines are also used to treat narcolepsy, a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sudden muscle weakness (cataplexy), and other symptoms. Amphetamines can help improve wakefulness and reduce episodes of cataplexy in individuals with narcolepsy, although they may not be effective for all symptoms or in all cases.

  3. Obesity (Off-label): In some cases, healthcare providers may prescribe amphetamines off-label to help with weight loss. Amphetamines can suppress appetite and increase metabolism, which may lead to short-term weight loss in some individuals. However, the long-term efficacy and safety of using amphetamines for weight loss are not well-established, and they are not recommended as a primary treatment for obesity.

How Does Amphetamine Work as a Central Nervous System Stimulant in the Brain and Body?

Amphetamines, classified as CNS stimulants, exert their effects primarily by enhancing the activity of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, particularly dopamine and norepinephrine. This action not only increases neurotransmitter activity in the central and peripheral nervous systems but also raises concerns about abuse, addiction, and withdrawal syndrome. Here’s how they work in the brain and body:

  1. Neurotransmitter Release: As CNS stimulants, amphetamines stimulate the release of dopamine and norepinephrine from nerve terminals into the synaptic cleft, the space between neurons.

  2. Reuptake Inhibition: They also block the reuptake of these neurotransmitters back into the presynaptic neuron, leading to increased levels in the synaptic cleft.

  3. Neurotransmitter Effects: Elevated levels of dopamine and norepinephrine enhance signaling between neurons in various brain regions, resulting in several physiological and behavioral effects:

  • Increased Alertness and Wakefulness: By enhancing the activity of norepinephrine, amphetamines promote wakefulness and alertness, making them useful in treating conditions like narcolepsy.

  • Improved Focus and Attention: The increased availability of dopamine and norepinephrine in certain brain regions, such as the prefrontal cortex, can enhance cognitive functions like focus, attention, and concentration. This effect is particularly beneficial for individuals with ADHD.

  • Elevated Mood and Pleasure: Dopamine is involved in the brain’s reward pathway, and increased dopamine levels can produce feelings of pleasure and euphoria. This effect contributes to the potential for abuse and addiction associated with amphetamines.

  • Suppressed Appetite: Amphetamines can reduce appetite by affecting brain regions involved in hunger regulation, which is why they have been used off-label for weight loss.

  • Increased Heart Rate and Blood Pressure: Amphetamines also have peripheral effects, such as increasing heart rate and blood pressure, which can be beneficial in medical contexts but can also pose risks, especially at higher doses or in individuals with cardiovascular conditions.

  1. Long-Term Effects: With chronic use, the brain may adapt to the presence of amphetamines, leading to tolerance, where higher doses are required to achieve the same effects, and dependence, where individuals may experience withdrawal symptoms when discontinuing use.

Overall, amphetamines exert their effects by altering neurotransmitter levels and signaling in the brain, leading to a range of physiological and behavioral changes. While they can be beneficial when used as prescribed for medical purposes, they also carry significant risks, including addiction and adverse effects, particularly when misused or abused. Therefore, it’s essential to use amphetamines under the guidance of a healthcare professional and to follow prescribed dosages closely.

Amphetamine Side Effects

Amphetamines can have both short-term and long-term side effects. It’s important to note that the severity and prevalence of these side effects can vary among individuals. Always follow the prescribed dosage and guidelines provided by a healthcare professional. Here are some short-term and long-term side effects associated with amphetamine use:

Additionally, drug abuse is a significant risk associated with the misuse of prescription stimulants, leading to potential health complications and addiction. Stimulant medication should be used responsibly, as misuse can result in serious health risks including sudden death, heart attack, or stroke, especially in individuals with certain heart conditions.

In the context of long-term effects, the dangers of illicit stimulants, which can lead to severe health issues such as cardiorespiratory disease and stroke, are noteworthy. These risks are in contrast to those associated with long-term use of prescription stimulants like amphetamine and dextroamphetamine, which, while effective for ADHD, carry risks of dependence and other long-term side effects.

Short-Term Side Effects:

  1. Insomnia: Difficulty falling or staying asleep is a common short-term side effect of amphetamines.

  2. Increased Heart Rate and Blood Pressure: Amphetamines are stimulants and can temporarily elevate heart rate and blood pressure.

  3. Decreased Appetite: Many individuals experience a reduction in appetite, leading to potential weight loss.

  4. Nervousness and Restlessness: Amphetamines can increase feelings of nervousness or restlessness.

  5. Dry Mouth: Reduced saliva production may result in dry mouth.

  6. Headache: Some individuals may experience headaches as a short-term side effect.

Long-Term Side Effects:

  1. Tolerance: With prolonged use, the body may develop tolerance to the effects of amphetamines, requiring higher doses for the same therapeutic response.

  2. Dependence and Addiction: Long-term use of amphetamines can lead to physical and psychological dependence, and in some cases, addiction.

  3. Cardiovascular Issues: Chronic use may contribute to increased heart rate, elevated blood pressure, and a higher risk of cardiovascular problems.

  4. Psychiatric Effects: Extended use may be associated with mood swings, anxiety, or other psychiatric symptoms.

  5. Gastrointestinal Issues: Long-term use may contribute to gastrointestinal problems such as stomach upset or constipation.

  6. Sleep Disturbances: Prolonged use can impact sleep patterns, leading to ongoing insomnia or other sleep disturbances.

  7. Weight Loss: Persistent appetite suppression may result in continued weight loss over time.

It’s essential for individuals prescribed amphetamines to have regular check-ups with their healthcare provider to monitor for both short-term and long-term side effects. Abruptly stopping medication or changing the dosage without medical supervision can lead to withdrawal symptoms.

Amphetamine Controlled Substance Classification Among Prescription Stimulants

Amphetamines are typically classified as Schedule II controlled substances under the CSA. Schedule II substances are considered to have a high potential for abuse, with severe psychological or physical dependence liability, but they also have accepted medical uses in the United States. This classification means that while amphetamines can be prescribed by healthcare professionals for legitimate medical purposes, their use is tightly regulated to minimize the risk of abuse and diversion.

Amphetamine Storage and Disposal

Storage:

  • Store amphetamine in a tightly closed container at room temperature.
  • Keep it away from moisture, heat, and direct light.
  • Store it out of reach of children and pets.

Disposal:

  • Do not flush amphetamine down the toilet unless instructed.
  • Use a drug take-back program if available.
  • If no take-back program is available, mix the medication with an unpalatable substance (like coffee grounds or cat litter), place it in a sealed plastic bag, and throw it in the household trash.

What is Dextroamphetamine?

Dextroamphetamine is mainly composed of d-amphetamine, a less powerful but effective version of amphetamine. While both amphetamine and dextroamphetamine therapies accomplish the same results, removing one of the salts makes dextroamphetamine less damaging to patients. Although youngsters account for most instances of ADHD, anyone over three can take the drug, according to a doctor’s prescription.

There are two capsule options for dextroamphetamine: the extended capsule, which is taken entirely at once, and the span capsule, which is taken gradually over a longer period. It is important to ensure you take this medication under the supervision and prescription of a professional healthcare practitioner because it has a broad spectrum of physiological and psychological side effects.

Dextroamphetamine Types

Dextroamphetamine is a type of amphetamine that consists of the dextrorotatory isomer of amphetamine. The dextroamphetamine molecule has two enantiomers: dextroamphetamine and levoamphetamine. The dextroamphetamine component is often the active ingredient in medications prescribed for conditions like Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. Here are a few common types of dextroamphetamine formulations:

  1. Dexedrine (Dextroamphetamine Sulfate): Dexedrine is a brand name for dextroamphetamine sulfate. It comes in both immediate-release and extended-release formulations. Dexedrine is often prescribed to treat ADHD and narcolepsy.

  2. Dextroamphetamine Saccharate, Amphetamine Aspartate, Dextroamphetamine Sulfate, and Amphetamine Sulfate (Adderall): Adderall is a combination medication that contains both dextroamphetamine and levoamphetamine. It is commonly prescribed for ADHD and narcolepsy. Adderall is available in immediate-release and extended-release forms.

  3. Zenzedi: Zenzedi is another brand name for dextroamphetamine sulfate, available in immediate-release tablets. It is prescribed for ADHD.

  4. Evekeo: Evekeo is a medication that contains racemic amphetamine, which includes both the dextroamphetamine and levoamphetamine enantiomers. It is used for the treatment of ADHD and narcolepsy.

It’s important to note that the specific formulations and brand names of dextroamphetamine may vary by region and are subject to change over time. The choice of medication and formulation depends on factors such as the individual’s response to the medication, the severity of symptoms, and the healthcare provider’s judgment.

Dextroamphetamine Dosages

The dosage of dextroamphetamine depends on several factors, including the specific formulation of the medication, the medical condition being treated, the individual’s age, weight, and response to the treatment. It is essential to follow the prescribed dosage and guidelines provided by a healthcare professional. Below are general dosage guidelines for some common dextroamphetamine formulations:

  1. Dexedrine (Dextroamphetamine Sulfate):

    • Immediate-Release Tablets: The typical starting dose for adults is 5 mg once or twice daily. The dosage may be adjusted based on individual response.
    • Extended-Release Capsules: For adults, the usual starting dose is 10 mg once daily in the morning.
  2. Adderall (Dextroamphetamine Saccharate, Amphetamine Aspartate, Dextroamphetamine Sulfate, and Amphetamine Sulfate):

    • Immediate-Release Tablets: The starting dose for adults is often 5 mg once or twice daily. Adjustments may be made based on individual response.
    • Extended-Release Capsules: The typical starting dose for adults is 20 mg once daily in the morning.
  3. Zenzedi (Dextroamphetamine Sulfate):

    • Immediate-Release Tablets: The starting dose for adults is often 2.5 mg to 5 mg once or twice daily. Adjustments may be made based on individual response.
  4. Evekeo (Racemic Amphetamine):

    • Tablets: The starting dose for adults is typically 5 mg once or twice daily. The dosage may be adjusted based on individual response.

It’s important to note that dosages for children and adolescents are generally lower and are determined based on factors such as age, weight, and the severity of symptoms. Dosages may need to be adjusted over time to achieve the desired therapeutic effect with the fewest side effects.

Dextroamphetamine Dosage Guidelines

Dextroamphetamine is a medication commonly prescribed to treat conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. The dosage of dextroamphetamine can vary depending on factors such as the specific condition being treated, the individual’s age, weight, and response to the medication. It’s crucial to follow the dosage instructions provided by a healthcare professional carefully. Here are some common dosage guidelines for dextroamphetamine:

  1. ADHD in Children (6 years and older):

    • Starting dose: Typically, the initial dose for children with ADHD is 5 mg once or twice daily.
    • Dosage adjustments: The dose may be gradually increased in increments of 5 mg at weekly intervals based on the individual’s response and tolerance.
    • Maximum dose: The maximum recommended dose is usually 40 mg per day, divided into multiple doses.
  2. ADHD in Adults:

    • Starting dose: The initial dose for adults with ADHD is often 5 mg once or twice daily.
    • Dosage adjustments: Similar to children, the dose may be adjusted gradually based on response and tolerance.
    • Maximum dose: The maximum recommended dose is typically 40 mg per day, divided into multiple doses.
  3. Narcolepsy:

    • Starting dose: The initial dose for narcolepsy is usually 5 mg once or twice daily.
    • Dosage adjustments: The dose may be titrated based on the individual’s response and tolerance.
    • Maximum dose: The maximum recommended dose for narcolepsy is generally higher than for ADHD and may range from 60 mg to 100 mg per day, divided into multiple doses.

It’s important to note that these are general dosage guidelines, and individual dosing may vary based on specific circumstances and healthcare provider recommendations. Additionally, dextroamphetamine is available in various formulations, including immediate-release and extended-release formulations, which may have different dosing schedules and maximum doses.

Always consult with a healthcare professional for personalized dosage recommendations and follow their instructions carefully. Do not adjust your dextroamphetamine dosage without consulting your healthcare provider, as improper dosing can lead to adverse effects or treatment inefficacy.

 

Dextroamphetamine Uses Including Adderall XR

Dextroamphetamine, a type of amphetamine, is used for various medical conditions. Its primary uses include:

  1. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Dextroamphetamine is commonly prescribed to manage symptoms of ADHD in both children and adults. It helps improve attention, focus, and impulse control.

  2. Narcolepsy: Dextroamphetamine is sometimes used in the treatment of narcolepsy, a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sudden muscle weakness (cataplexy), and sleep attacks.

Dextroamphetamine Onset and Duration

he onset and duration of action of dextroamphetamine can vary depending on factors such as the specific formulation (e.g., immediate-release or extended-release), individual metabolism, dosage, and route of administration. Here are approximate onset and duration times for different formulations of dextroamphetamine:

  1. Immediate-Release Dextroamphetamine:

    • Onset: The onset of action for immediate-release dextroamphetamine is typically relatively rapid, usually within 30 minutes to 1 hour after ingestion.
    • Duration: The duration of action for immediate-release dextroamphetamine is shorter compared to extended-release formulations, typically lasting around 4 to 6 hours.
  2. Extended-Release Dextroamphetamine:

    • Onset: Extended-release formulations of dextroamphetamine are designed to provide a more gradual release of the medication into the bloodstream, resulting in a delayed onset of action. Onset may occur within 1 to 2 hours after ingestion.
    • Duration: The duration of action for extended-release dextroamphetamine is longer compared to immediate-release formulations, typically lasting around 8 to 12 hours. Some extended-release formulations may provide effects for up to 16 hours.

It’s important to note that these are general estimates, and individual responses to dextroamphetamine can vary. Factors such as the presence of food in the stomach, concurrent medications, and individual differences in metabolism can influence the onset and duration of action.

How Long Does Dextroamphetamine Stay in Your System?

The half-life of dextroamphetamine, like other amphetamines, can vary depending on individual factors such as metabolism, age, weight, and liver function. However, the half-life of dextroamphetamine is generally reported to be in the range of 9 to 11 hours in adults.

This means that it takes approximately 9 to 11 hours for half of the dextroamphetamine dose to be metabolized and eliminated from the body. After several half-lives, the drug is considered to be mostly cleared from the body.

It’s important to note that individual variability exists, and the half-life of dextroamphetamine may be shorter or longer in some individuals. Additionally, factors such as hydration levels, kidney function, and the presence of other medications or substances can influence drug metabolism and elimination, potentially altering the half-life.

How Long is Dextroamphetamine Detectable in Your System?

The detectability of dextroamphetamine in various bodily fluids depends on several factors, including the type of drug test used, the dose taken, frequency of use, individual metabolism, and the specific formulation of dextroamphetamine. Here are some general guidelines for the detectability of dextroamphetamine:

  1. Urine Test: Dextroamphetamine is typically detectable in urine for approximately 1 to 3 days after use. However, in chronic or heavy users, detection may extend up to 7 days or longer.

  2. Blood Test: Dextroamphetamine can be detected in blood for a shorter period compared to urine, typically within 12 to 24 hours after use. In chronic users or cases of high-dose ingestion, detection may be extended slightly.

  3. Saliva Test: Dextroamphetamine is detectable in saliva for a shorter duration compared to urine, typically within 1 to 3 days after use.

  4. Hair Test: Dextroamphetamine can be detected in hair follicles for a longer period compared to other types of drug tests. It may be detectable in hair for up to 90 days or longer after use, depending on factors such as the length of hair and frequency of use.

It’s important to note that these are general estimates, and individual variability can influence the detectability of dextroamphetamine. Factors such as hydration levels, body mass index (BMI), and liver function can affect drug metabolism and elimination, potentially altering detection times.

Dextroamphetamine Efficacy

The efficacy of dextroamphetamine refers to its effectiveness in treating the conditions for which it is prescribed, primarily attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. Here’s a breakdown of its efficacy for each condition:

  1. ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder):

    • Dextroamphetamine is widely used and considered effective in managing the symptoms of ADHD in both children and adults. These symptoms include inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.
    • Studies have shown that dextroamphetamine and other stimulant medications can improve attention, focus, impulse control, and overall behavior in individuals with ADHD.
    • The efficacy of dextroamphetamine in treating ADHD is supported by numerous clinical trials, observational studies, and real-world evidence. It is considered a first-line treatment for ADHD by many healthcare professionals.
  2. Narcolepsy:

    • Dextroamphetamine is also used to manage symptoms of narcolepsy, a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sudden muscle weakness (cataplexy), and other symptoms.
    • Studies have demonstrated that dextroamphetamine and other stimulant medications can improve wakefulness, reduce excessive daytime sleepiness, and decrease the frequency of cataplexy attacks in individuals with narcolepsy.
    • The efficacy of dextroamphetamine in treating narcolepsy is supported by clinical trials and real-world experience. It is often prescribed as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for narcolepsy.

Overall, dextroamphetamine is considered an effective medication for managing the symptoms of ADHD and narcolepsy in many individuals. However, its efficacy can vary from person to person, and it may not be suitable for everyone. Healthcare professionals typically evaluate the individual’s specific needs, medical history, and response to treatment to determine the most appropriate medication and dosage.

It’s important to note that while dextroamphetamine can be effective in managing symptoms, it may also have side effects and potential risks, particularly when misused or taken improperly. Therefore, it should only be used under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional who can monitor its effects and ensure safe and effective treatment.

 

How Does Dextroamphetamine Work in the Brain and Body?

Dextroamphetamine, like other amphetamines, exerts its effects primarily by influencing the activity of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, particularly dopamine and norepinephrine. Here’s how dextroamphetamine works in the brain and body:

  1. Neurotransmitter Release: Dextroamphetamine stimulates the release of dopamine and norepinephrine from nerve terminals into the synaptic cleft, the space between neurons.

  2. Reuptake Inhibition: Dextroamphetamine also blocks the reuptake of dopamine and norepinephrine back into the presynaptic neuron, leading to increased levels of these neurotransmitters in the synaptic cleft.

  3. Neurotransmitter Effects: Elevated levels of dopamine and norepinephrine enhance signaling between neurons in various brain regions, resulting in several physiological and behavioral effects:

    • Increased Alertness and Wakefulness: By enhancing the activity of norepinephrine, dextroamphetamine promotes wakefulness and alertness, making it useful in treating conditions like narcolepsy.

    • Improved Focus and Attention: The increased availability of dopamine and norepinephrine in certain brain regions, such as the prefrontal cortex, can enhance cognitive functions like focus, attention, and concentration. This effect is particularly beneficial for individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    • Elevated Mood and Pleasure: Dopamine is involved in the brain’s reward pathway, and increased dopamine levels can produce feelings of pleasure and euphoria. This effect contributes to the potential for abuse and addiction associated with dextroamphetamine.

    • Suppressed Appetite: Dextroamphetamine can reduce appetite by affecting brain regions involved in hunger regulation, which is why it has been used off-label for weight loss.

    • Increased Heart Rate and Blood Pressure: Dextroamphetamine also has peripheral effects, such as increasing heart rate and blood pressure, which can be beneficial in medical contexts but can also pose risks, especially at higher doses or in individuals with cardiovascular conditions.

  4. Long-Term Effects: With chronic use, the brain may adapt to the presence of dextroamphetamine, leading to tolerance, where higher doses are required to achieve the same effects, and dependence, where individuals may experience withdrawal symptoms when discontinuing use.

Overall, dextroamphetamine alters neurotransmitter levels and signaling in the brain, leading to a range of physiological and behavioral changes. While it can be beneficial when used as prescribed for medical purposes, it also carries significant risks, including addiction and adverse effects, particularly when misused or abused. Therefore, it’s essential to use dextroamphetamine under the guidance of a healthcare professional and to follow prescribed dosages closely.

 

Dextroamphetamine Side Effects

Both short-term and long-term use of dextroamphetamine, like any medication, can be associated with side effects. It’s important to note that not everyone will experience these side effects, and their severity can vary among individuals. Always follow the prescribed dosage and guidelines provided by a healthcare professional. Here are some short-term and long-term side effects associated with the use of dextroamphetamine:

Short-Term Side Effects:

  1. Insomnia: Difficulty falling or staying asleep is a common short-term side effect of dextroamphetamine.

  2. Increased Heart Rate and Blood Pressure: Dextroamphetamine is a stimulant and can temporarily elevate heart rate and blood pressure.

  3. Decreased Appetite: Many individuals experience a reduction in appetite, leading to potential weight loss.

  4. Nervousness and Restlessness: Dextroamphetamine can increase feelings of nervousness or restlessness.

  5. Dry Mouth: Reduced saliva production may result in dry mouth.

  6. Headache: Some individuals may experience headaches as a short-term side effect.

Long-Term Side Effects:

  1. Tolerance: With prolonged use, the body may develop tolerance to the effects of dextroamphetamine, requiring higher doses for the same therapeutic response.

  2. Dependence and Addiction: Long-term use of dextroamphetamine can lead to physical and psychological dependence, and in some cases, addiction.

  3. Cardiovascular Issues: Chronic use may contribute to increased heart rate, elevated blood pressure, and a higher risk of cardiovascular problems.

  4. Psychiatric Effects: Extended use may be associated with mood swings, anxiety, or other psychiatric symptoms.

  5. Gastrointestinal Issues: Long-term use may contribute to gastrointestinal problems such as stomach upset or constipation.

  6. Sleep Disturbances: Prolonged use can impact sleep patterns, leading to ongoing insomnia or other sleep disturbances.

It’s essential for individuals prescribed dextroamphetamine to have regular check-ups with their healthcare provider to monitor for both short-term and long-term side effects. Abruptly stopping medication or changing the dosage without medical supervision can lead to withdrawal symptoms.

Dextroamphetamine Controlled Substance Classifcation

Dextroamphetamine is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance in the United States.

Dextroamphetamine Storage and Disposal

Storage: Store dextroamphetamine in a secure location away from children and pets, at room temperature, and away from moisture and light.

Disposal: Dispose of dextroamphetamine safely by following local regulations or medication take-back programs. If no specific guidelines exist, mix the medication with an undesirable substance (e.g., coffee grounds), seal it in a container, and dispose of it in the household trash.

Risks of Amphetamine and Dextroamphetamine

Is Amphetamine and Dextroamphetamine Addictive?

Yes, both amphetamine and dextroamphetamine have the potential for addiction, especially when used inappropriately or without proper medical supervision. These substances are central nervous system stimulants, and their potential for abuse and dependence is well-documented.

Can You Overdose on Amphetamine and Dextroamphetamine

Yes, it is possible to overdose on amphetamine and dextroamphetamine. An overdose occurs when a person takes more of the medication than their body can handle, leading to toxic effects. Overdosing on these stimulant medications can have serious consequences and may require immediate medical attention.

If you suspect that someone has overdosed on amphetamine or dextroamphetamine, it is essential to seek emergency medical help immediately. Call emergency services or go to the nearest emergency room for assistance. Prompt medical treatment can help prevent serious complications and improve the chances of recovery.

Amphetamine and Dextroamphetatmine and Alcohol Use

Mixing amphetamines, including dextroamphetamine, with alcohol is generally not recommended due to the potential for adverse effects and interactions.

Overall, combining amphetamines, including dextroamphetamine, with alcohol is not recommended due to the potential for serious adverse effects and interactions. It’s essential to use these medications only as prescribed by a healthcare professional and to avoid alcohol use while taking them. If you have questions or concerns about alcohol use and medication interactions, it’s important to discuss them with your healthcare provider for personalized guidance and support.

Amphetamine and Dextroamphetamine and Pregnancy

Both amphetamine and dextroamphetamine are classified as Pregnancy Category C medications, meaning that animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus, but there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans. Therefore, the use of these medications during pregnancy should be carefully considered, and the potential benefits should be weighed against the potential risks to the fetus.

Ultimately, the decision to use amphetamine or dextroamphetamine during pregnancy should be made in consultation with a healthcare provider, weighing the potential risks and benefits for both the pregnant individual and the fetus. It’s crucial to discuss any concerns or questions you may have openly with your healthcare provider to ensure the safest and most appropriate treatment plan for you and your baby.

Amphetamine Vs Dextroamphetamine Similarities and Differences

Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine are both central nervous system stimulant drugs that belong to the same class of medications. While they share similarities, there are also differences between them. Here’s a comparison of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine:

Similarities:

  1. Class: Both amphetamine and dextroamphetamine belong to the class of drugs known as amphetamines. They have similar mechanisms of action and pharmacological effects.

  2. Medical Uses: Both drugs are prescribed to treat conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. They can improve focus, attention, alertness, and impulse control in individuals with ADHD, and they help promote wakefulness and reduce excessive daytime sleepiness in individuals with narcolepsy.

  3. Side Effects: Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine share many of the same potential side effects, including insomnia, decreased appetite, weight loss, increased heart rate and blood pressure, irritability, and anxiety. Both medications can also have more serious side effects, such as cardiovascular complications and psychiatric symptoms, particularly with misuse or high doses.

Differences:

  1. Composition: Amphetamine is a compound that contains both dextroamphetamine and levoamphetamine, while dextroamphetamine is a specific stereoisomer of amphetamine. Dextroamphetamine is the active component responsible for most of the pharmacological effects associated with amphetamines.

  2. Pharmacokinetics: Dextroamphetamine is considered the more potent and pharmacologically active isomer compared to levoamphetamine. As a result, medications containing only dextroamphetamine, such as Dexedrine, may be more targeted and have fewer side effects compared to those containing a mixture of both isomers.

  3. Prescription Formulations: While both amphetamine and dextroamphetamine are available in various formulations, such as immediate-release and extended-release tablets or capsules, some medications may contain only dextroamphetamine as the active ingredient (e.g., Dexedrine), while others may contain a mixture of dextroamphetamine and other amphetamine salts (e.g., Adderall).

  4. Clinical Response: Although both drugs are effective in treating ADHD and narcolepsy, individual patients may respond differently to each medication. Some individuals may experience better symptom control or fewer side effects with one medication compared to the other, and healthcare providers may adjust treatment based on individual response and tolerance.

In summary, amphetamine and dextroamphetamine are similar medications with overlapping uses and effects. However, differences in composition, pharmacokinetics, and clinical response may influence their suitability for individual patients. It’s essential to work closely with a healthcare provider to determine the most appropriate medication and dosage for your specific needs.

What is Stimulant Addiction?

Stimulant addiction, also known as stimulant use disorder, is a condition characterized by compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior involving stimulant drugs. Stimulants are a class of drugs that increase alertness, attention, and energy levels while elevating mood and enhancing feelings of pleasure. Common stimulants include amphetamines, methamphetamine, cocaine, and prescription medications like Adderall (amphetamine-dextroamphetamine) and Ritalin (methylphenidate).

Stimulant addiction typically develops as a result of repeated use of these drugs, leading to changes in the brain’s reward system and neurotransmitter pathways. Over time, individuals may develop tolerance, where larger doses are needed to achieve the desired effects, as well as dependence, where they experience withdrawal symptoms when not using the drug.

Does Insurance Cover Stimulant Addiction Treatment?

Typically, yes. Insurance coverage for stimulant addiction treatment can vary based on the specific insurance plan and its policies. While many insurance plans provide coverage for substance use disorder treatment, including addiction to stimulants, the extent of coverage may differ.

It is advisable for individuals seeking stimulant addiction treatment to work closely with their insurance provider and the treatment facility’s admissions team to understand the specific terms of coverage. This collaboration helps individuals make informed decisions about treatment options and navigate the financial aspects of addiction care. Additionally, seeking assistance from the treatment facility’s insurance coordinator can provide valuable support in verifying benefits and understanding the insurance process.

Common Insurance Plans Used for Addiction and Mental Health Treatment

Common types of insurance plans used for addiction and mental health treatment include:

  1. Preferred Provider Organization (PPO):

    • PPO plans offer flexibility in choosing healthcare providers, allowing individuals to visit both in-network and out-of-network providers without a referral. PPO plans typically cover a portion of the cost for addiction and mental health rehab services, but out-of-pocket expenses may be higher when using out-of-network providers.
  2. Health Maintenance Organization (HMO):

    • HMO plans require individuals to choose a primary care physician (PCP) who coordinates their care and provides referrals to specialists, including addiction and mental health treatment providers. HMO plans often have lower out-of-pocket costs but may limit coverage to in-network providers, except in emergencies.
  3. Exclusive Provider Organization (EPO):

    • EPO plans combine aspects of both PPO and HMO plans, offering a network of preferred providers for individuals to choose from. While EPO plans do not require a PCP or referrals for specialists, coverage is typically limited to in-network providers, except in emergencies.
  4. Point of Service (POS):

    • POS plans offer individuals the option to receive care from both in-network and out-of-network providers. However, using out-of-network providers may result in higher out-of-pocket costs, and individuals may need a referral from their PCP to see specialists, including addiction and mental health treatment providers.

These insurance plans may vary in terms of coverage, network providers, cost-sharing requirements (e.g., copayments, coinsurance, deductibles), and authorization requirements for addiction and mental health rehab services. It’s essential for individuals to review their insurance plan documents, understand their coverage details, and verify network providers before seeking treatment. Additionally, individuals may need to obtain preauthorization or prior approval for certain rehab services to ensure coverage and minimize out-of-pocket expenses.

Responsible Use of Amphetamine and Dextroamphetamine

For the responsible use of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine:

  1. Follow Prescription: Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

  2. Avoid Misuse: Do not take for non-medical purposes or in higher doses than prescribed.

  3. Monitor Side Effects: Report any adverse effects like increased heart rate, anxiety, or insomnia to your healthcare provider.

  4. Avoid Mixing: Do not combine with alcohol or other stimulants.

  5. Secure Storage: Keep the medication in a safe place to prevent misuse by others.

  6. Regular Check-ups: Have regular appointments with your doctor to monitor your response and adjust the dose if necessary.

Conclusion

Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine are central nervous system stimulants used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy, available in medications like Adderall XR and Dexedrine. These drugs enhance focus and reduce impulsivity, helping manage ADHD symptoms in both pediatric and adult patients. They come in immediate release and extended release forms, providing flexibility in treatment. However, these medications carry risks of side effects, including weight loss, decreased appetite, chest pain, mood swings, and potential substance abuse. As Schedule II drugs, they require careful medical supervision and adherence to prescribed doses. Combining medication with behavioral therapy can offer a comprehensive approach to treating ADHD. Regular consultation with a healthcare provider is essential to ensure safe and effective treatment, considering the patient’s medical history and possible interactions with other substances.

Seeking Treatment? We Can Help!

At California Prime Recovery, as an in-network provider we work with most insurance plans, such as:

If you or a loved one are struggling with mental health challenges or substance abuse, reach out to California Prime Recovery today. Our team of compassionate professionals is here to support your journey towards lasting well-being. Give us a call at 866-208-2390

FAQs

Dextroamphetamine is an amphetamine enantiomer. It acts as a stimulant on the central nervous system (CNS) and is often used to treat narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

The two amphetamine isomers that have an impact on the body are dextroamphetamine (also known as d-amphetamine) and levoamphetamine (also known as l-amphetamine). Dextroamphetamine is three to five times stronger than levoamphetamine.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is treated with a combination of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine sold under the brand names Adderall, Adderall XR, and Mydayis.

It works by altering the levels of certain endogenous brain neurotransmitters. Both amphetamine and dextroamphetamine belong to the stimulant family of medications. It may help you concentrate more efficiently, boost self-control, and improve your attention.

Come work with us

Get Help Now

Admission Coordinators are available 24/7.
Take Control Of Your Life and Call Now.